Things People Should Know Before Starting Their Petya Ransomware Recovery

Petya ransomware is a somewhat new ransomware virus from Germany, although users from other parts of the world might be infected too. A ransomware message that is written in English will obviously target more than German-speaking nationals; it will target English-speaking people as well. This is why each and every business needs to take ransomware recovery seriously.

Understanding Petya ransomware

Petya ransomware works differently from other ransomware. It encrypts the entire hard drive rather than its separate files. Thus, the computer is completely unusable and cannot start Windows until the disk is decrypted or the ransom paid. That being said, regular ransomware decryption software will not work.

After the encryption of the disk is complete, the computer restarts automatically and the wallpaper is changed with a message explaining the steps to recovery. The virus will then ask the user to visit a particular website to gain their personal decryption code. Usually, this ransomware comes with shared files on Dropbox. Users should receive an email with an invitation to view a file on Dropbox and if you open it, the virus will automatically infect the system. However, Petya ransomware only encrypts files stored on a hard disk, which means that files stored on a shared network or in the cloud should not be affected.

Users should receive an email with an invitation to view a file on Dropbox and if you open it, the virus will automatically infect the system. However, Petya ransomware only encrypts files stored on a hard disk, which means that files stored on a shared network or in the cloud should not be affected. It is important to remember that different ransomware programs act differently but they all have one common goal: to infect computers in order to gain compensation.

How can users decrypt their files?

To remove the damage caused by this virus, users must remove the Petya ransomware from their computer. To unlock the files encrypted by Petya ransomware, users can pay the ransom and purchase the decryption key or restore them from a backup copy of their hard drive. If a user sees that downloads are infected by Petya Ransomware, they should scan their files with anti-malware programs like Malwarebytes or SpyHunter. Real-time protection modules on both programs should detect infected downloads and protect against infection/encryption. Remember, it is cheaper to guard a ransomware rather than decrypt a hard drive or files.